Brep vs Visrep Models

Brep vs Visrep Models

What are the advantages of Brep vs Visrep models, and how do you tell them apart? Brep Models Brep refers to Boundary Representation. As the name suggests, the boundary between solid and non-solid geometry is in view here, the solid geometry being a collection of interconnected surfaces. This is a mathematically precise representation of geometry. Depending on the format and the CAD software you have in your possession, the features and underlying sketches may be editable, or the shapes may be editable – but generally speaking, if you don’t have the CAD system used to create the file, you cannot edit the features or sketches unless you run a...
CAD Format Analysis

CAD Format Analysis

What CAD format, and what version, did that colleague just give you? Most of the time it’s clear what format it is, and most of the time the version doesn’t matter, BUT – sometimes it does. This is a repost from a few years back. It has turned out to be one of our most referenced resources, so here it is again! The following CAD Format Analysis cheat-sheet will allow you to open up CAD files in a text editor like Notepad or Notepad ++ to find out what format they truly are, and in some cases, which version. I’ve seen cases from some of our customers where CAD files had, for whatever reason, been given the wrong extensions; once we learn...
CAD Dimensioning

CAD Dimensioning

CAD dimensioning tools allow you to add dimensions to vertices, edges and faces, whether they are linear, arcs, planes or cylindrical. You can place the dimension wherever you like, move dimensions after the fact, control what type of units are being displayed, the color of dimension text, and what views the dimensions show up in. In addition to CAD dimensioning tools, TransMagic has a host of capabilities which make the quoting and estimation process easier. These include: Markup tools for adding design or manufacturing notes to CAD models or assemblies Viewing tools to create custom views and select which dimensions are visible per view Rendering and...
Optimizing STL Output

Optimizing STL Output

30 Years of STL From a humble beginning in 1987, when STL was developed by the Albert Consulting Group for 3D Systems, the format has been become a mainstay for 3D printing and has remained virtually unchanged over all these years. The name STL was derived from STereoLithography; STL uses a series of linked triangles to roughly define the surface geometry of a 3D CAD model. General STL Optimization Guidelines Whether you’re using the STL file for 3D printing, machining, or other purposes, you’ll want to set the resolution or mesh density to meet your product or prototype requirements. If your resolution is too rough, you’ll end up losing or...
Pre-Processing for Polygon Reduction

Pre-Processing for Polygon Reduction

Pre-processing for polygon reduction is possible using polygon facet resolution settings. Since the Polygon Reduction tool starts with a default facet density, it can sometimes be useful to adjust that pre-set facet density to a higher value. More information about the Polygon Reduction tool can be found here. Change Facet Resolution Starting with a sample CAD component, you can select the model with the Single Select tool, or just “Select All”, and right click to get the Change Facet Resolution options (see figure 1): Normal: The lowest resolution option, approximately 27 segments on a cylinder or hole. Medium High: Slightly higher than normal,...
Do Your Translations Look Like This?

Do Your Translations Look Like This?

Do your translations look like this? If so, you’ve got problems! This is the actual result of a translation by a software solution we will not name here – but you can imagine how dismayed the user was when they saw this output! The user contacted us and we set them up with a copy of TransMagic to solve their problem right away. Mis-translations can take many forms, from missing geometry (usually the most complex, organic geometry is missing, and prismatic geometry is retained), to missing details and PMI, to geometry that is there, however unusable; the screenshot above is simply the most outlandish and entertaining case of unusable geometry...